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men led by lieutenant bob evland, they were known as the fabulous father. the fabulous four found a bunker and a small path that had been worn out. it looked like it had been utilized. the entire lotus battery has been surrounded by hundreds of thousands of minds and barbed wire, machine gun nests, it was extremely heavily fortified, but they found a well-worn path, and they decided to go down it. as they went down the path, they found a small pill box, they broke through the door, and they captured all the men in the pill box. remarkably, a lieutenant was educated in the united states, and he said, basically, i'm ready to surrender or. lieutenant evland said to him, take me to the commander of the fort, and that's exactly what he did. with his tommy gun at his side, the fabulous four went through the lotus battery. they went down an elevator, they went through an amphitheater that looked like a football field, and they went through the depths of this guns of-and-a-half roan type situation, and they got to the commanding officer's office. evland decided to breakthrough the door x
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world gr
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
know very personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3 one in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called give me tomorrow, you were a machine gunner and it is an honor to have you here. like george company, for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential citation for their actions at pointe du hoc, but hills 400 remains an open issue. they deserve a presidential citation for that action. they charged that hill and held against all odds. the last letter to tom, one of my main characters in this book, got the presidential unit citation for dog company and that is now in progress. i think out of all the units in the european theater of operation, this is one that needs to be looked at again. dog company's action merits presidential unit citation. hopefully a little bit of luck, we will get the powers that be to look at it again. [inaudible] >> like everything. i don't know about that. bureaucracy works in a very slow away. i just hope the veterans of dog company receive the honor they deserve. yes
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
can can. >> yes, bob british medical journal. most has been about the impact on the federal budget and balancing one pocket versus another. what analysis has been done on say on the exchanges on the complicate of the employability of seniors if an employer has to carry these additional costs for an extended period of time? my high hypothesis would be may would make them less employable in some ways, either that or hasten the flight away from employers even providing insurance. on the consumer side how would these increase cost effect access to care and probably qlt of care? >> paul, you want to start? >> sure. on your first question, i have actually not heard anyone or any of the studies suggest extending medicare eligibility age might hasten the point where employers might not have coverage at all. what i was trying to add earlier a majority outside of the industries where retire -- the effect of the age would be that at the margin there will be some employees that would continue in the work force longer because the subsidize they were seeing from the employer for health insurance
-- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at the back. [applause] >> bob, thank you for your support for the uk youth parliament. now i'd like to ask to conclude the debate from scotland, mr. reardon fortune to wind up the debate. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would first like to extend my sympathies to the scottish parliament members who can't be with here today. so here i am. >> we just heard fromsome fantastic points for and against but a few stand out in my mind. this is right that someone of our age, doing the exact same amount of work and the exact same profession can legally be paid substantially less than someone in their 30s? it is unacceptable when it's aged toward young people. will minimum wage help young people or aggravate youth unemployment. as we all know, 16 and 17-year-olds receive minimum wage. 18 and 17-year-olds receive more and anyone over 21 receive more. are we to take from this the government believes the 18 and 17-year-olds to be less hard working or 16 and 17 years are less hard working. i should hope not. it's also cut
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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